Sexist, funny, both, or neither?: 150 words on the series finale of 30 Rock

Sexist, funny, both, or neither?

Sexist, funny, both, or neither? After seven seasons, the series finale of 30 Rock re-affirms masculinist logics and gendered expectations about employment by characterizing the desire to work as “male.” 30 Rock’s comedy is a contemporary, cultural artifact of the racial, historical, political, economic, and social ideologies of the United States of America. Its comedic discourse reflects sexist, patriarchal, and androcentric values that often manifest in gendered stereotypes that would normally offend, yet comedians enjoy a freedom in their profession to voice their thoughts in ways that would be considered socially unacceptable outside of humorous settings. Hence, Liz Lemon’s agreeable reply that “fatherly” behavior represents both employment and chauvinism may be analyzed as offensive and humorous, concurrently. Which all leads me to say: I desire a modern television show to feature a happy, employed, successful, childless, unmarried (and not looking) woman lead. And her absence is not funny to me.

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